Feb 152018

What If I told you that in 2015, there were 800 CCW Permits in all of Orange County, yet over 9,300 today? Wouldn’t that make you wonder what Stan Sniff’s problem is in Riverside? Orange County went to a municipal bankruptcy in the 1990’s and is only marginally better off than Riverside County. Yet, Somehow they have figured out how to have a 10-fold increase in CCW Permits to accommodate demand.

A little more than 2½ years ago, there only were about 800 active CCW permits in Orange County, with two professional staff members handling the application process.

Now there are more than 9,300 active CCW permits in O.C. — an avalanche-like surge in demand that has forced the creation of an entire department within the OCSD, the Carry a Concealed Weapon (CCW) Licensing Unit, which employs more than two-dozen sworn and professional staff.

Applicants for CCWs run the gamut, from students to owners of Fortune 500 businesses to plumbers, lawyers and elected officials.

In 2009, in one of Sheriff Sniff’s many arguments with the Riverside County Board of Supervisors, Sniff was admonished to start issuing more CCW Permits. Back then, there were about 500 of them. Today, there are about 2700 – 3.5 times less than Orange County over a period of time three times as long. This is a key quote from the 2009 article:

According to Undersheriff Valerie Hill, roughly 500 county residents have concealed carry permits. “We take (the issuance of permits) very seriously,” she told the board. “Every time we issue a permit, it’s a liability for the county.”

Got it? The allegedly pro-gun sheriff looks at CCW Permits as a liability. Wrong answer, but this is the answer of a Richard Roth endorsing anti-gun liberal. People have been banging the CCW permit drum for nearly 10 years and the Sheriff has ignored them.

Stone highlighted the prospective release of 27,000 inmates in the next six months from California prisons and the impact that might have on public safety as one of the motivating factors behind the resolution, which Sheriff Stan Sniff has the option — but not the obligation — to act upon.

In 2009, then Supervisor Jeff Stone was sounding the alarm over “Fed Kicks” and their effect on crime. As we’ve written about ,the Sheriff did not plan to staff jails or address this problem either. This has been a consistent failure pattern with Sheriff Sniff and we will have more to say about the legacy of his leadership on enforcement and incarceration.

Back to Orange County:

Now, Stiverson says, the OCSD — after staffing up and relocating the CCW Licensing Unit to larger offices — usually is able to see an applicant for his or her initial CCW appointment within two to six months depending on fluctuations in public demand and unit staffing levels. The agency’s target goal is to reduce initial appointment wait times to less than two months.

Sheriff Sniff’s department sees wait times of at least 24 months. (Unless you are a “friend” of the sheriff) We’ve documented these horrendous wait times in several articles. The Orange County Sheriff’s department provides an interesting contrast. The bungling of Sheriff Sniff has also caused several cities to spend some of their limited resources processing CCW permits at their local level as well.

If Sheriff Sniff was truly committed to issuing CCW permits to anyone that is not a donor or a buddy, he’d have addressed the issue in a similar manner to Orange County. Nowhere in the Orange County article do you hear their department calling CCW permits a “liability”. This contrast is yet another reason for people once supportive of the Sheriff to fire him from office.

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